Maccabean revolt

Jonathan's conquests Simon's conquests In the narrative of I Maccabeesafter Antiochus issued his decrees forbidding Jewish religious practice, a rural Jewish priest from ModiinMattathias the Hasmoneansparked the revolt against the Seleucid Empire by refusing to worship the Greek gods. Mattathias killed a Hellenistic Jew who stepped forward to offer a sacrifice to an idol in Mattathias' place. He and his five sons fled to the wilderness of Judah.

Maccabean revolt

Visit Website Led by the Jewish priest Mattathias and his five sons, a large-scale rebellion broke out against Antiochus and the Seleucid monarchy. When Matthathias died in B. Judah called on his followers to cleanse the Second Temple, rebuild its altar and light its menorah—the gold candelabrum whose seven branches represented knowledge and creation and were meant to be kept burning every night.

This wondrous event inspired the Jewish sages to proclaim a yearly eight-day festival.

Maccabean revolt

The first Book of the Maccabees tells another version of the story, describing an eight-day celebration that followed the rededication but making no reference to the miracle of the oil.

Other Interpretations of the Hanukkah Story Some modern historians offer a radically different interpretation of the Hanukkah tale.

Jewish scholars have also suggested that the first Hanukkah may have been a belated celebration of Sukkot, which the Jews had not had the chance to observe during the Maccabean Revolt. Hanukkah Traditions The Hanukkah celebration revolves around the kindling of a nine-branched menorah, known in Hebrew as the hanukiah.

Jews typically recite blessings during this ritual and display the menorah prominently in a window as a reminder to others of the miracle that inspired the holiday. In another allusion to the Hanukkah miracle, traditional Hanukkah foods are fried in oil.

Potato pancakes known as latkes and jam-filled donuts sufganiyot are particularly popular in many Jewish households.

[BINGSNIPMIX-3

Other Hanukkah customs include playing with four-sided spinning tops called dreidels and exchanging gifts.

In recent decades, particularly in North America, Hanukkah has exploded into a major commercial phenomenon, largely because it falls near or overlaps with Christmas. From a religious perspective, however, it remains a relatively minor holiday that places no restrictions on working, attending school or other activities.

Get two months off on your gift subscription today.Intertestamental Period and New Testament Background -page 3 The Hasmonean family (named after the Hebrew name of Simon) launched an uprising led by.

WHO WERE THE PHARISEES AND THE SADDUCEES? T he Pharisees and the Sadducees are the two most well-known Jewish sects from the time of Yeshua the Messiah.

Both, to some extent, opposed Yeshua during his ministry and received condemnation from him. In this article, I am going to examine the origins, beliefs, and impact of these two rival groups.

In a long run, President Trump’s first Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, a former United States Senator from Alabama, has proven to be inefficient, to say the least.

The death of Alexander the Great of Greece in BCE led to the breakup of the Greek empire as three of his generals fought for supremacy and divided the Middle East among themselves.

Ptolemy secured control of Egypt and the Land of Israel. Seleucus grabbed Syria . Dec 09,  · The Maccabean Revolt (Hebrew: מרד החשמונאים ‎‎; Greek: Επανάσταση των Μακκαβαίων) was a Jewish rebellion, lasting from to BC, led by the Maccabees against the Seleucid Empire and the Hellenistic influence on Jewish life.

Timeline In the narrative of I Maccabees, after Antiochus issued his decrees forbidding Jewish religious practice, a rural. The Second Temple (Hebrew: בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי ‬, Beit HaMikdash HaSheni) was the Jewish holy temple which stood on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem during the Second Temple period, between BCE and 70 lausannecongress2018.coming to Jewish tradition, it replaced Solomon's Temple (the First Temple), which was destroyed by the Neo-Babylonian Empire in BCE, when.

The Maccabean Revolt